Mergers and Acquisitions Under the FCPA, Part I

Today, I begin a three-part series on mergers and acquisitions under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Today I will review the pre-acquisition phase, focusing the information and issues you should review, tomorrow in Part II, I will look at how you should use that information in the evaluation process and in Part III, I will consider steps you should take in the post-acquisition phase. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) Guidance, issued in 2012, makes clear that one of the ten hallmarks of an effective compliance program is around mergers and acquisitions (M&A), in both the pre and post-acquisition context. A company that does not perform adequate FCPA due diligence prior to a merger or acquisition may face both legal and business risks. Perhaps, most commonly, inadequate due diligence can allow a course of bribery to continue – with all the attendant harms to a business’s profitability and reputation, as well as potential civil and criminal liability. In contrast, companies that conduct effective FCPA due diligence on their acquisition targets are able to evaluate more accurately each target’s value and negotiate for the costs of the bribery to be borne by the target. But, equally important is that if a company engages in the suggested actions, they will go a long way towards insulating, or at least lessening, the risk of FCPA liability going forward.

Nat Edmonds, in an interview in the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) entitled, “Former Justice Official: How to Buy Corrupt Companies” said “I think most companies and their outside counsel believe any potential corruption problem should stop a deal from occurring. Companies would be surprised to learn that neither the Securities and Exchanges Commission nor the DOJ takes that position ...

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