Rezension: From Protest to Surveillance

von Christian Wickert

In Kooperation mit dem Surveillance Studies Blog veröffentlicht Criminologia Rezensionen von Bücher aus den Bereichen Überwachung & Kontrolle und Kriminologie.

Weitere Rezensionen finden sich hier.

Titel: From Protest to Surveillance – The Political Rationality of Mobile Media. Modalities of Neoliberalism Autor: Leistert, Oliver Jahr: 2013 Verlag: Peter Lang ISBN: 978-3-631-64313-6

Diese Rezension wurde verfasst von Marta Brzezinska, Warschau.

Oliver Leistert’s in his highly ambitious From Protest to Surveillance – The Political Rationality of Mobile Media. Modalities of Neoliberalism reflects the position of mobile media (and the omnipresence of the mobile technology, particularly mobile phones) against a background and in the connection with social construction of using (and understanding) technology, communication issues, relations of power and – what is most important – governmentality as the key concept in the whole book. Regarding this From Protest to Surveillance treats governmentality as a tool to interpret the sphere of mobile technology at the point of contact between the society and the power, with the involvement of political rationality.

The author, being aware of the extent of the subject, narrows it down to key aspects and theirs layers, which he carefully exposes. Basically these are: surveillance and protest. The question of surveillance at the beginning is not in the foreground in the study, somehow not evident at the first sight, but it deeply penetrates the whole work. The so-called domestication of technology, and as the result – domestication of surveillance (and its normality, or even banality) –, the issue of its visibility known from works by David Lyon or Daniel Trottier can be traced here from a different angle, i.e. from the perspective of social sciences and politics ...

Zum vollständigen Artikel

Cookies helfen bei der Bereitstellung unserer Dienste. Durch die Nutzung erklären Sie sich mit der Cookie-Setzung einverstanden. Mehr OK