Four Hiroshima bombs a second: how we imagine climate change

● By Dr. David Holmes, Monash University ● The planet is building up heat at the equivalent of four Hiroshima bombs worth of energy every second. And 90% of that heat is going into the oceans. Right, now I’ve got your attention. It’s widely acknowledged that we need to keep climate change below 2C to avoid catastrophic impacts on society. To do so we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions. But this makes for tough choices for our leaders and for ourselves. Convincing people of the urgency of climate change is no mean feat. Representing climate change and ocean warming as Hiroshima bombs attracted the attention of news media around the world. So, when it comes to sharpening people’s focus, which images have the most impact? Visualising climate change In a recently-released paper looking at how people visualise climate change, Saffron O’Neill at University of Exeter joined other researchers in the UK, US and Australia, to see how people engaged with climate change images drawn from mass media sources in those countries. They investigated responses to images ranging from icons of nature, such as coral reefs, snowstorms, bushfires, cracked ground and ice sheets to human made phenomena, such as wind farms, traffic jams, low reservoirs, smoke-stacks, and fuel pumps and then images of political leaders. For each image they wanted to measure: “salience” – whether it raised the importance of climate change empowerment or “self-efficacy” – the sense of being able to take any action on climate change. Images of climate impacts were the most salient: in order of impact – flood aerial view, ice sheet, deforestation, polar bear, cracked ground, coral reef. Of the human generated images, smokestacks, traffic jams and temperature graphs led the way in terms of distress ...Zum vollständigen Artikel

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  • Four Hiroshima bombs a second: how we imagine climate change

    theconversation.com - 5 Leser - The planet is building up heat at the equivalent of four Hiroshima bombs worth of energy every second. And 90% of that heat is going into the oceans. Right, now I’ve got your attention. It’s widely acknowledged…

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