Most ridiculous lawsuits: Lawsuit: $73,000 Glass Pool Table Not Up to Scratch

Play on it with anything but specially-coated, custom-made balls, and you scratch the glass.

Brant Martin, a Dallas attorney representing the buyer (identified in the suit only as Desert Beach, an LLC) says his client learned this fact the hard way:

He bought a $73,000 custom G-1 glass-top table for home use, played on it with “a standard set of pool balls, the kind that might be found in any pool hall,” and discovered to his horror that this left the table “scuffed, scratched, damaged—essentially destroyed.”

The suit says shipping materials that accompanied the table included a sealed envelope with an inconspicuous notation saying that the balls shipped by Nottage were specially made for use with the table—but that this amounted to the “hiding” of so material a warning.

The buyer feels an injustice has been done, says Martin. The complaint seeks $219,000 in damages. Nottage, asked for comment by ABC News, did not respond.

Nottage’s website describes the table’s glass surface as protected by Vitrik, a proprietary coating “which allows the balls to roll silently at a near identical rate to a standard cloth table… It’s highly durable, completely non-toxic and is transparent.” The site says the custom balls it sells are coated with a special finish “compatible” with Vitrik ...

Zum vollständigen Artikel

Cookies helfen bei der Bereitstellung unserer Dienste. Durch die Nutzung erklären Sie sich mit der Cookie-Setzung einverstanden. Mehr OK