Radmacher, Granatino and the missing translation/Übersetzungen beim Notar

I've mentioned the Radmacher/Granatino case before: Prenups in the UK/Eheverträge in GB. It was regarded as an exciting case, because it decided that prenuptial contracts could be valid in England and Wales. But since the parties entered into their contract in Germany and were not British, although their married life was in England, I wasn't sure how much effect it might have. (The marriage should have been governed by English law, but the fact that the contract was entered into in Germany affected the court's decision). At all events, the contract giving Mr Granatino no claims in the case of divorce was upheld. I have now seen an article (in German) by a German notary commenting on the fact that Mr Granatino did not get a translation of the contract, although the German notary told him to. Reading the case report, one does not get the impression that it would have changed his decision to enter into the contract, and I presume that the court thought he had made his own bed and had to lie in it, so to speak. The decision can be found at www.bailii.org. Here's part of it:
# At the time the parties met in November 1997 they were both living in London. The wife comes from a very rich German family, whose wealth is derived primarily from two very successful businesses in chromatography, filtration and the processing/refinement of paper, and the manufacture of paper. The husband comes from a family which is well-off, his father having been a senior executive with IBM, at one time in charge of its European operations. He now resides in London for tax reasons, but retains property in Antibes. When the couple met the husband had been working in London for about 2 years with JP Morgan & Co, and was earning about £50,000, which was a substantial sum at that date, particularly given his age, and which had increased to about £120,000 by the time the ante-nuptial agreement was executed ...
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