Ramsauer against Denglisch/Ramsauer kontert Denglisch

The Bavarian transport minister, Peter Ramsauer, has long since banned a lot of English words from the German language in his ministry. Here's an interview in German, which appeared in Stern in February 2010. This story was widely reported once again yesterday, in the UK press as well as the German. The Independent reports today ('Denglish' now verboten):
His aim, which was backed by Chancellor Angela Merkel, was to defend his language against the spread of "Denglish" – the corruption of German with words such as "handy" for mobile phone and other expressions including "babysitten" and "downloaden". As a result, words such as "laptop", "ticket" and "meeting" are verboten in Mr Ramsauer's ministry. Instead, staff must use their German equivalents: "Klapprechner", "Fahrschein" and "Besprechung" as well as many other common English words that the minister has translated back into German.
He may have been diverting attention from the effects of snow on German rail and road transport:
Mr Ramsauer took time off from his role as minister in charge of sorting out some of the worst winter traffic chaos in decades yesterday to announce that his campaign to save German had been a roaring success. He said many Germans felt excluded by the growing use of "Denglish".
Here is part of a list of Ramsauer corrections from the Rhein-Zeitung ...Zum vollständigen Artikel

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